Volume 6, Issue 4, July 2018, Page: 123-133
Research on Optimization of Public Service Facilities Land Efficiency in Changchun City Based on Compact City
Lv Jing, School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Jilin Jianzhu University, Changchun, China
Yan Tianjiao, School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Jilin Jianzhu University, Changchun, China
Received: Oct. 17, 2018;       Published: Oct. 18, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajce.20180604.13      View  202      Downloads  32
Abstract
With the continuous development of the social economy, the city has a chaotic image of unwarranted expansion, so the proposal of compact cities and stock planning has been very important. Land for public service facilities is a major component of urban functional land, so it can be used to reflect the compactness of urban land. Based on the background of compact city, this paper analyzed the service efficiency of public service facilities land in Changchun City, including land for educational and cultural facilities, sports facilities, medical and health facilities and social welfare facilities. Through GIS and other technical means to process the data, and comprehensive analysis of the number of facilities, spatial distribution and accessibility analysis, the results of spatial allocation were obtained. In order to consider the behavioral factors of human beings, these results were divided into suppliers, suppliers and demanders for comparative analysis, and the influencing factors and their interrelationships leading to these results were obtained. At the same time, this gave specific suggestions on regional control, spatial structure compactness and spatial element allocation from the macro, meso and micro levels. Furthermore, it will give the relevant planning department measures and recommendations about optimizing the space efficiency of land use for public service facilities.
Keywords
Compact City, Land for Public Service Facilities, Efficiency, Optimization Strategy, Changchun
To cite this article
Lv Jing, Yan Tianjiao, Research on Optimization of Public Service Facilities Land Efficiency in Changchun City Based on Compact City, American Journal of Civil Engineering. Vol. 6, No. 4, 2018, pp. 123-133. doi: 10.11648/j.ajce.20180604.13
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